Rip Currents

Rip Currents

To have a good time, get the right gear!

Rip Currents 

Rip currents are powerful, narrow channels of fast-moving water that flow from the shore out to the open sea. They can occur at any beach with breaking waves, including those in Broward County. Rip currents typically form when waves break strongly in some areas and weakly in others, creating a narrow, fast-moving channel of water moving away from the shore. These currents can pull even the strongest swimmers out to deeper water quickly. To survive a rip current, it’s essential to stay calm and conserve energy. If you find yourself caught in a rip current, do not attempt to swim directly back to shore against the current, as this can lead to exhaustion. Instead, swim parallel to the shoreline until you are out of the current’s grip, then swim back to shore at an angle. If you are unable to swim out of the current, float or tread water and signal for help by waving your arms and yelling. Understanding how rip currents work and knowing the proper response can save lives. Beachgoers should always swim near lifeguard stations and heed any posted warnings or flags indicating dangerous conditions. Staying informed and prepared can help ensure a safe and enjoyable beach experience in Broward County.

Lightening

Lightening

To have a good time, get the right gear!

Lightening Can Come Out of Nowhere

The weather in Broward County’s beaches, particularly lightning, poses significant health and safety risks for beachgoers. Florida is known as the lightning capital of the United States, and its coastal areas are no exception. Lightning can strike suddenly, making it crucial for visitors to be aware of the signs of an impending storm and take appropriate precautions to ensure their safety.

Beachgoers should be vigilant for darkening skies, increasing wind, and the distant sound of thunder, which often precede a storm. A general rule is that if you can hear thunder, you are close enough to be struck by lightning. The “30-30 Rule” is a helpful guideline: if the time between seeing lightning and hearing thunder is 30 seconds or less, seek shelter immediately. Wait at least 30 minutes after the last clap of thunder before returning to the beach.

To protect themselves, visitors should move to a substantial building or a fully enclosed vehicle at the first sign of a thunderstorm. Avoid open areas, water, tall objects like trees and poles, and metal objects such as umbrellas and beach chairs, which can attract lightning. Remaining in a safe location until the storm passes is vital to prevent lightning-related injuries or fatalities.

By staying informed about the weather and recognizing the signs of an impending storm, beachgoers in Broward County can enjoy their time at the beach while staying safe from the dangers of lightning.